Friday, April 20, 2018

"SCARECROW AND MRS. KING": Top Favorite Season Two (1984-1985) Episodes

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Below is a list of my favorite Season Two episodes from the CBS series, "SCARECROW AND MRS. KING". Created by Brad Buckner and Eugenie Ross-Leming, the series starred Kate Jackson and Bruce Boxleitner: 



"SCARECROW AND MRS. KING": TOP FAVORITE SEASON TWO (1984-1985) Episodes

1 - 2.13 Spiderweb

1. (2.13) "Spiderweb" - When a secret operation to deliver three Communist defectors is jeopardized by a security leak, evidence points to Amanda King as the mole. Dana Eclar, Joan McMurtrey and Priscilla Morrill guest-starred.



2 - 2.19 DOA Delirious on Arrival 

2. (2.19) "D.O.A.: Delirious on Arrival" - Amanda King ingests a mysterious and fatal drug intended for fellow agent Lee Stetson and her behavior undergoes a transformation that leads her to behave in an extreme manner. 



3 - 2.01 To Catch a Mongoose

3. (2.10) "To Catch a Mongoose" - In this season premiere, Amanda is sent to London to help Lee catch and identify an old high classmate that the Agency believes is a well known assassin called "the Mongoose". Stephen Davies guest-starred.



4 - 2.17 Odds on a Dead Pigeon

4. (2.17) "Odds on a Dead Pigeon" - A paroled government convict hires an assassin who looks like Amanda in order to get close to Lee and kill him. Dennis Lipscomb guest-starred. 



5 - 2.11 The Three Faces of Emily

5. (2.11) "The Three Faces of Emily" - British agent Emily Farnsworth helps Lee and Amanda nab a man responsible for selling stolen secret plans for a futuristic fighter plane developed by the two countries. Jean Stapleton, Randy Brooks and Jeff Osterhage guest-starred.



HM - 2.08 Affair at Bromfield Hall

Honorable Mention: (2.08) "Affair at Bromfiend Hall" - When Lee and Amanda go to England to investigate a major security leak, Amanda is unexpectedly drawn into a sex scandal involving a peer that is designed to lure Lee to his death. John Rhys-Davies, Meg Wynn Owen and James Warwick guest-starred.

Saturday, April 14, 2018

"STATE OF PLAY" (2003) Photo Gallery

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Below are photos and screencaps from the 2003 BBC miniseries, "STATE OF PLAY". Written by Paul Abbott and directed by David Yates, the miniseries starred John Simm, David Morrissey, and Polly Walker: 


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Tuesday, April 10, 2018

"THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE" (2013) Review

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"THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE" (2013) Review

Despite my enjoyment of the 2012 movie, "THE HUNGER GAMES", I must admit that I had regarded its sequel, "THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE" with a wary eye. One, the movie franchise had replaced Gary Ross with a new one, Francis Lawrence. And two, a relative who had read all three of Suzanne Collins' novels expressed a less-than-impressed opinion of the second installment, which this movie is based upon. But enamored of the first film, I decided to give this second one a chance. 

"CATCHING FIRE" picked up not long after the ending of the first installment. The winners of the 74th Hunger Games, Katniss Everdeen and Peeta Mellark, have returned to their homes in the impoverished District 12. But due to their winnings, both now reside in upscale neighborhoods. Before they are scheduled to embark upon their victory tour of Panem, Katniss receives a visit from the tyrannical President Snow, who reveals that her actions in the recent Games have inspired rebellions across the districts. He orders her to use the upcoming tour to convince everyone her actions were out of genuine love for Peeta, not defiance against the Capitol. The victory tour goes off well, aside from an emotionally difficult and violent visit to District 11, the home of the deceased tributes, 12 year-old Rue (whom Katniss had befriended) and Thesh (who had saved Katniss). 

Despite the tour and the installment of violent Peacekeepers in District 12 to crack down on any signs of rebellion, President Snow remains fearful of Katniss being used as a symbol of any possible upheavals. The new Head Gamekeeper, Plutarch Heavensbee, proposes a special Hunger Games called the Third Quarter Quell (the 75th Hunger Games), in which the tributes will be selected from previous victors. He believes the Games would either ruin Katniss' reputation, or kill her. As the only female victor from District 12, Katniss is naturally selected. However, her mentor Haymitch Abernathy is chosen as the male tribute. Peeta immediately volunteers to take his place. Haymitch informs the pair that most of the tributes are angry over being forced to participate again and suggests they make alliances. Although Katniss is against the idea, she and Peeta adhere to Haymitch's advice and find themselves in competition that ends with surprising results.

Despite becoming a fan of "THE HUNGER GAMES", I continued to resist watching Suzanne Collins' novels. Perhaps one day I will read them. But due to my unfamiliarity with the plots, the end of "CATCHING FIRE" pretty much took me by surprise. And this is a good thing. The movie's first third hinted of a growing rebellion against President Snow's rule over Panem in scenes that included Katniss and Peeta's harrowing visit to District 11, the beating of Gale Hawthorne (Katniss' closest friend and possible lover) at the hands of the Peacekeepers, and Snow's growing paranoia over Katniss. Even the scenes featuring Katniss' participation in the 75th Hunger Games continued hint the growing rebellion against Snow's administration and the Capitol through the characters like Haymitch, Katniss' friend and costume designer Cinna, and those serving as tributes. Characters like Beetee Lasnier and Johanna Mason expressed their dismay or anger at being forced to participate in another Hunger Game during their pre-Game interviews with Caesar Flickerman. Even Peeta tried to manipulate Snow into stopping the Game with false hint that Katniss might be pregnant. And during the Game, I found it interesting that Katniss and Peeta ended up forming an alliance with Lasnier and his District 3 counterpart Wiress, Johanna, and the two tributes from District 4, Finnick Odair and Mags - the only tributes to express any hostility toward the Games and President Snow. I had figured that all of them would eventually openly defy Snow by getting out of the Games. But thanks to some very good writing from Suzanne Collins, along with screenwriters Simon Beaufoy and Michael deBruyn; the circumstances behind the beginning of the rebellion really took me by surprise.

Another aspect of "CATCHING FIRE" that took me by surprise, turned out to be its cinematography. With the change of director, the franchise acquired a new cinematographer, Jo Willems. And I liked the way Willems expanded the look of Panem in the film. I suppose one could thank the movie's plot, which allowed viewers a look at the exclusive neighborhood of District 12, into which Katniss and Peeta moved following their victory at the 74th Games; the other country's districts, and the tropical environment that served as the 75th Games' new setting. But more importantly, Willems expanded the visual style of the Capitol . . . especially in a scene that featured Katniss and Peeta's arrival. This expanded visual really took me by surprise. The movie also acquired a new costume designer, Trish Summerville. I have to be honest. I found her costume designs similar to the ones created by Judianna Makovsky. I really do not see the differences . . . especially for those costumes worn by the cast for the Capitol sequences. Mind you, they are just as imaginative and beautiful as the ones featured in the first film. I simply cannot see the differences. There was one outfit - worn by Elizabeth Banks - that I found very original:

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I understand that the song "Atlas", written and performed by the group Coldplay have earned both Golden Globe and Grammy nominations. Congratulations to the band. However, I do not remember the song. Sorry. I simply did not find it memorable. I was also a little disappointed in how Lawrence (the director) seemed to rush the first third of the movie - namely the sequence featuring Katniss and Peeta's victory tour and District 12's problems with the so-called Peacekeepers that culminated in Gale's beating. It seemed as if he was in a hurry for the movie to focus on the 75th "Quarter Quell" Hunger Games. And if I may be blunt, I was also not that impressed by Alan Edward Bell's editing. It struck me as a little choppy - especially in the movie's first half.

The performances by the cast struck me as first rate. Jennifer Lawrence and Josh Hutcherson did superb jobs in continuing the development of their characters, Katniss Everdeen and Peeta Mallark. I noticed in this film that Lawrence conveyed a great deal of realism in Katniss' growing difficulty in containing her emotions regarding those she cared about. This was especially apparent in the scene following Gale's public whipping, Peeta's near death experience during the first day of the Games and the visit to District 11. Someone once described Peeta as a saint. I never could view him in this manner. He strikes me as a rather manipulative individual, who can also be a very good liar. What is amazing about Hutcherson's performance is that he perfectly balanced Peeta's manipulative skills with his near all consuming love for Katniss and willingness to do anything for her. 

Liam Hemsworth got a chance to develop his portrayal of Katniss' childhood best friend, Gale Hawthorne. Hemsworth, like Hutcherson, did an excellent job in balancing the different layers of Gale's personality - namely his love for Katniss and his ever-growing obsession with rebellion against President Snow and the Capitol. Woody Harrelson continued to knock it out of the ballpark as Katniss and Peeta's alcoholic mentor, Haymitch Abernathy. I think this is the first time moviegoers got a real look at Haymitch's hostility toward President Snow, especially in the scene which featured the announcement of past winners participating in the Quarter Quell. Harrelson portrayed that small moment with such intense anger. Donald Sutherland continued his brilliant portrayal of the brutal, yet manipulative politician, President Coriolanus Snow. 

Sutherland perfectly captured Snow's quiet machinations that could rival Palpatine from the STAR WARS franchise. Yet, the actor also did a subtle job in conveying Snow's growing paranoia over Katniss' popularity and growing role as a symbol of rebellion. I had greatly enjoyed Elizabeth Banks' performance as Effie Trinket in the first movie. I loved her performance in this film, as the actress allowed filmgoers a deeper look into the chaperone's persona, beyond her usual shallowness. I am also happy that Lenny Kravitz reprised the role of Cinna, Katniss and Peeta's stylist for the Games. As usual, the actor/musician gave a warm and beautiful performance as Katniss' emotional solace before the Games. One particular scene in which Cinna endured a brutal beating over a dress he had created for Katniss proved to be a very painful one to watch, thanks to Kravitz and Lawrence's performances, along with the other Lawrence's direction. Stanley Tucci was marvelous as ever in his continuing portrayal of Caesar Flickerman, the Games' announcer and commentator. Toby Jones reprised his role as Flickerman's fellow commentator, Claudius Templesmith. But his role had been reduced considerably.

The movie also featured some newcomers to the franchise. Philip Seymour Hoffman gave a sly and subtle performance as the Games' new Head Gamemaker, who schemes with President Snow to destroy Katniss' reputation and possibly, her life. Sam Claflin continued to surprise me at how charismatic he could be, in his engaging portrayal of Finnick Odair, one of the tributes from District 4, during the 75th Games. Jena Malone was a hoot as the outspoken and aggressive female tribute from District 7, Johanna Mason. The strip scene inside the elevator is one that I remember for years to come. I was surprised to see Jeffrey Wright appear in this film. He gave a subtle, yet intelligent performance as the male tribute for District 3, Beetee Latier. Wright also clicked very well with Amanda Plummer, whose performance as Latier's fellow District 3 tribute Wiress, struck me as deliciously off-center. Lynn Cohen nearly stole the show as Finnick's fellow tribute from District 4, Mags. I thought she did a pretty good job, although I am at a little loss over the fanfare regarding her performance.

Many seemed to regard "CATCHING FIRE" as superior to the original 2012. I cannot agree with this opinion. I am not saying that "CATCHING FIRE" is a disappointment or inferior to "THE HUNGER GAMES". But I certainly do not regard it as better. I would say that it is just as good. And considering my very high opinion of the first film, one could assume that my opinion of this second film is equally positive, thanks to an excellent screenplay written by Simon Beaufoy and Michael deBruyn, first rate direction from Francis Lawrence, and a superb cast led by Jennifer Lawrence and Josh Hutcherson.


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Friday, April 6, 2018

NORTH AND SOUTH: BOOK II" (1986) - Episode Five "December 1864 - February 1865"

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"NORTH AND SOUTH: BOOK II" (1986) - EPISODE FIVE "December 1864 - February 1865" Commentary

"NORTH AND SOUTH: BOOK II" finally reached its home stretch in Episode Five, the penultimate episode. Well . . . almost. Beginning several weeks after the end of Episode FourEpisode Five continued the miniseries' portrayal of the Civil War's last year for the Hazards and the Mains. It also put three or four subplots to rest. 

Episode Five opened with George Hazard still imprisoned inside Libby Prison in Richmond, Virginia. The episode also continued with Madeline Main's efforts to feed Charleston's poor and war refugees, Charles Main and Augusta Barclay's wartime romance, and the survival of Mont Royal's remaining inhabitants. Episode Five also closed several subplots that included Stanley and Isobel Hazard's war profiteering, Elkhannah Bent and Ashton Main Huntoon's plot against Jefferson Davis' administration, and Madeline's relationship with former officer Rafe Beaudine. 

This episode featured some excellent dramatic moments. Lewis Smith certainly shined in his portrayal of Charles Main, who had hardened considerably after three-and-a-half years of war. This was especially apparent in scenes that included Charles' reluctance to help his cousin Orry Main rescue George Hazard from Libby Prison, his cold-blooded killing of a Union prisoner, his attempt prevent fellow scout Jim Pickles from deserting and his emotionally distant attitude toward lady love Augusta Barclay and her manservant, Washington. Another well acted scene featured Brett Main Hazard and Semiramis' encounter with former Mont Royal overseer, Salem Jones. Watching Erica Gimpel point a shotgun at Tony Frank, considering their characters' past history, brought a smile to my face. I also enjoyed the poignant scene between Brett and her mother, Clarissa Main, while the latter painfully reminisced about the past; thanks to Genie Francis and Jean Simmons' performances. And both James Read and Jonathan Frakes knocked it out of the ballpark in the scene that featured George's confrontation with Stanley and Isobel over their war profiteering. They were supported by fine performances from Wendy Kilbourne and Mary Crosby.

But another truly superb performance came from Terri Garber, who got a chance to portray Ashton Huntooon's increasing doubts over Elkhannah Bent's scheme against Davis. This was especially apparent in one scene in which Ashton silently expressed shame over her willingness to prostitute herself to a potential contributor for Bent's plot. She received fine support from Jim Metzler as her husband James Huntoon and Patrick Swayze as Orry Main. But I felt that Philip Casnoff's Bent nearly became slightly hammy by the scene's end. Even Lesley Anne Down and Lee Horsley managed to shine as Madeline and the infatuated Rafe Beaudine. But I must admit that I found one of their later scenes slightly melodramatic.

Yet, despite these dramatic gems, I was not particularly impressed by the writing featured in Episode Five. I had a problem with several subplots. One, I had a problem with the subplot involving Stanley and Isobel's profiteering. It made me wish the screenwriters had adhered to author John Jakes' original portrayal of the couple in his 1984 novel, "Love and War". I felt this subplot had ended with a whimper. It was bad enough that George had killed Stanley and Isobel's partner in a bar fight. But aside from the dead partner, the only way the couple could face conviction was to confess. And I found it implausible that a remorseful Stanley would still be willing to do that after receiving an earful of angry insults from George. Very weak.

Episode Five also allowed Madeline and Bent's subplots to interact for the purpose of killing off Rafe Beaudine. Frankly, I found the idea of Bent traveling from Richmond to Charleston for more funds . . . only to be told to seek hard cash from "the Angel of Charleston" - namely Madeline. The latter recruited a retired stage actress portrayed by Linda Evans to impersonate her and discover Bent's plans. And what was Madeline's next act? She left her boarding house (in the middle of the night) to warn . . . who? The script never made it clear about whom Madeline had intended to warn. Why? Because her night time task was interrupted by Bent, who had recognized the stage actress. And before Bent could lay eyes upon Madeline, Rafe comes to her rescue. What can I say? Contrived.

I also found Bent's scheme to get rid of Jefferson Davis and assume political and military control of the Confederacy rather ludicrous. Audiences never really saw him recruit any real political support for his scheme . . . just money from various wealthy Southerners. The screenplay never allowed Bent to make any effort to recruit military support for the weapons he had purchased. In the end, I found the entire subplot lame and a waste of my time.

And finally, we come to the efforts of "Madeline the Merciful" to find food for Charleston's poor. Personally, I found this subplot ludicrous. Madeline did not bother to recruit other women from Charleston's elite to help her. And I suspect some of them would have been willing to help. I also found this subplot extremely patronizing. Again, it seemed to embrace the "savior complex" trope to the extreme. The subplot seemed to infantilize all social groups that were not part of the city's white elite or middle-class - namely fugitive slaves, working-class whites and all free blacks. I found this last category surprising, considering that the screenwriters failed to acknowledge that not all free blacks were poor. In the end, this entire subplot struck me as a white elitist fantasy that Julian Fellowes would embrace.

The production values featured in the episode struck me as top-notch. Both director Kevin O'Connor and the film editing team did excellent work for the actions scenes in Episode Five. I found myself impressed by the scenes that featured George's escape from Libby Prison, his bar fight with Stanley and Isobel's profiteering partner, Bent and Rafe's fight in Charleston and the former's encounter with Orry and the Huntoons back in Virginia. More importantly, Robert Fletcher continued to shine with his outstanding costume designs, as shown in the following images:

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Yes, Episode Five featured some fine dramatic moments and performances. It even featured some solid action scenes. But . . . I was not particularly happy with most of the subplots. I also found the ending of one particularly subplot rather disappointing. No one felt more relieved than me when Episode Five finally ended.

Sunday, April 1, 2018

"CLOUD ATLAS" (2012) Photo Gallery

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Below are images from "CLOUD ATLAS", the 2012 adaptation of David Mitchell's 2004 novel. Directed by Tom Tykwer, along with Lana and Andy Wachowski; the movie stars Tom Hanks and Halle Berry: 


"CLOUD ATLAS" (2012) Photo Gallery

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