Tuesday, September 30, 2014

"IRON MAN" (2008) Review

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"IRON MAN" (2008) Review

I had never heard of the Marvel comic book hero, Iron Man, until I saw the trailer for the 2008 movie, a few months before it first hit the movie theaters. Mind you, I had heard of Iron Man’s alter ego – Tony Stark. The latter’s name had been mentioned in several Internet articles written about Spider-Man. Which is why I could not summon any excitement when I saw the trailer for the movie, which starred Robert Downey, Jr. 

Until the release of 2000’s "X-MEN", I have never been that familiar with most of Marvel Comics’ costumed crime fighters – with the exception of Spider-Man, the Hulk and the Fantastic Four. I had spent a great deal of my recreational time with DC Comics characters like Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman and Aquaman. Just about anyone could imagine my reaction when I learned that Robert Downey Jr. had been signed to portray Tony Stark aka Iron Man. I was not particularly thrilled. But I was impressed by the major cast of actors who had signed up for the film – Downey Jr., Gwenyth Paltrow, Terrence Howard and Jeff Bridges. All four performers have been favorites of mine over the years, along with director Jon Favreau. And since "IRON MAN" was a Marvel Comics film, I decided to give it a chance.

I might as well say it right now. "IRON MAN" immediately became one of my favorite movies of 2008. And if I must be honest, I still think it is one of the BEST superhero movies I have ever seen, hands down; although not in my top ten list. I would place "IRON MAN" in the same circle as "X-MEN 3: THE LAST STAND" (2006)"SPIDER-MAN 3" (2007)"THE DARK KNIGHT" (2008) and "THE DARK KNIGHT RISES" (2012). Yes, it is that good.

What would be the point of focusing upon the movie’s many virtues, when my previous statements pretty much said it all? But . . . I am going to try, anyway. And I would like to start with the excellent screenplay written by Mark Fergus, Hawk Ostby, Arthur Marcum and Matthew Hollaway. They managed to create a good, solid story focusing upon Iron Man’s origins. In an unusual move, the writers began the story with Tony Stark in Afghanistan in the company of an Army escort. Stark had just presented a demonstration of Stark Industries’ latest weapon – the Jericho missile. While Stark jokes around with his military escort, Afghan terrorist group called Ten Rings. At this point, the movie rewind back to thirty-six hours earlier before Stark’s departure from the States. This opening immediately conveyed to me that the movie might turn out to be ten times better than I had originally assumed. By the time Tony Stark uttered those last words - ”I’m Iron Man” - it proved me right.

There are two aspects of "IRON MAN" that truly made it a cinematic gem for me. One happened to be Jon Favreau’s direction. The other turned out to be the movie’s superb cast. And speaking of the cast, I might as well start with the man of the hour. What can I say about Robert Downey Jr.? He IS Tony Stark aka Iron Man. Downey now owns the role. I have never seen an actor take possession of a role so thoroughly since Daniel Day Lewis in "THERE WILL BE BLOOD", Daniel Craig’s debut as James Bond in "CASINO ROYALE" and Johnny Depp as Captain Jack Sparrow in the"PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN" trilogy. Downey is also the first actor or actress I have seen portray a comic book hero as a wiseass. And he also managed to produce sparks with not only his supporting cast, but also with an android and a computer voice.

Supporting Downey was Terrence Howard as USAF Lieutenant Colonel James "Rhodey" Rhodes, Air Force liaison to Stark Industries and personal friend of Tony Stark. Howard portrayed Rhodes as a stalwart military man who found Stark’s cavalier life both exasperating and enduring. I have never seen Howard do comedy . . . until this movie. And I was surprised to discover that his flair for comic timing seemed to match Downey’s. Some people have pointed out his role had been reduced. I cannot say that I agree. One, he had yet to become War Machine, Tony’s future armored crime fighting partner. However, his line - "Next time, baby" - as he glanced at the extra armor suit seemed to hint that he will play a bigger role in future movies. Unfortunately, he ended up being replaced by Don Cheadle and did not get to wear the War Machine suit. And two, Howard possessed such a strong on-screen presence that no one was bound to forget . . . no matter how many scenes he had. This was especially the case in one scene in which Howard's "Rhodey" seemed to be enjoying the flight to Afghanistan just a bit too much. 

When I first learned that Gwenyth Paltrow would be playing Stark’s personal assistant, Virginia "Pepper" Potts, I found myself wondering if her career was in a decline. Playing the main hero’s Girl Friday seemed like a step down – even from her role in "SKY CAPTAIN: WORLD OF TOMORROW". Fortunately, the script and Paltrow’s witty and elegant performance gave her the opportunity rise above the usual clich√© of the Girl Friday role. Mind you, "Pepper" Potts never struck me as interesting as the charming and conniving Polly Perkins from "SKY CAPTAIN". But instead of becoming the "damsel-in-distress", Paltrow ended up helping Stark/Iron Man to defeat the main villain. Good show!

Speaking of villains, I must applaud Jeff Bridges for portraying one of the smoothest that I have seen on the silver screen – namely Tony Stark’s business partner and mentor Obadiah Stane. Not even Ian McDiarmid’s Palpatine from "STAR WARS" had possessed such subtlety when it came to evil. At first glance, Bridges did not seem the type who could effectively portray a villain. Then I recalled his performance in the 1985 thriller, "JAGGED EDGE”, in which he portrayed a similarly subtle villain. Being a skillful actor, Bridges managed to convey many aspects of Stane’s personality – a superficial warmth and intelligence that hid a murderous and manipulative streak. 

Another memorable villain was portrayed by actor Faran Tahir, who portrayed Raza, leader of the terrorist group – the Ten Rings – hired to kidnap Stark while the latter was in Afghanistan. Like Bridges, Tahir did an admirable in projecting villainy with suave, sophistication and a strong presence. In regard to a strong presence, I could say the same about Shaun Tolb, who portrayed Dr. Ho Yinsen, an Afghan surgeon and captive of the Ten Rings that saved Stark’s life. I have seen Talb portray some interesting characters over the years. But I must admit that his warm, yet firm portrayal of Yinsen made me realize that he possessed quite a commanding presence.

As I had earlier pointed out, the movie’s four screenwriters managed to produce a script that featured a very solid story. Unlike many other comic book movies, ”IRON MAN” seemed to be laced with a great deal of witty dialogue and humor. There were times when I wondered whether I was watching a superhero action film. But there was plenty of action-filled scenes to remind me that this movie was basically an adventure film – like Iron Man’s two encounters with the Ten Rings group in Afghanistan, his encounter with two USAF fighter planes and his showdown with Stane in downtown Los Angeles. Director Jon Farveau, along with the four screenwriters and cast, managed to bring together all of the action, humor and drama with perfect balance. Rounding out the cast of supporting actors was Clark Gregg, who made his first appearance as S.H.I.E.L.D. Agent Phil Coulson. And he made quite an impact for such a low-key performance. For he is now starring in Marvel's television series, "AGENTS OF S.H.I.E.L.D.".

Earlier, I had stated that "IRON MAN" was a perfect movie. Perhaps I had been a bit premature. "IRON MAN" was not completely "perfect". I do have a few quibbles about the movie. One of them happened to be the first sequence in Afghanistan. I realize that the setting of Iron Man’s origins could not be in Vietnam. And it would make sense for the setting to be changed to either Iraq or Afghanistan. The problem is that most of the sequence featuring Stark’s captivity by the Ten Rings was boring as hell. It almost seemed to drag forever. And matters did not help much that most of this sequence was set inside a series of caves. Another problem I had with the movie was its score. Quite frankly, I found it unmemorable. But I am not surprised. I can only think of three comic book hero movies that had a score or theme song I found memorable. Unfortunately, "IRON MAN" is not one of them. And if I must be frank, the screenplay written by Mark Fergus, Hawk Ostby, Art Marcum and Matt Holloway did not quite strike me as original. Aside from the flashback in the movie's first twenty minutes, "IRON MAN" was a basic, paint-by-numbers costume hero origin tale. In the end, Downey Jr.'s performance elevated this film to something unique, not the screenplay.

But despite the first Afghanistan sequence and the movie’s score, it is easy to see why "IRON MAN" nearly became the summer movie of 2008 for me. With Jon Farveau in the director’s chair and Robert Downey Jr. as the leading man, the movie has become – at least in my eyes – one of the top five of its genre.

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